Travel Vaccinations

Here at DAM Health we pride ourselves on connecting people to the ones they love or the experiences they long for. We strive to improve our clients health and wellbeing by providing high value, world class services through constant innovation, dedication and efficiency.

We are proud to announce that we are now in a position to offer travel vaccines at our Specialised Travel clinics throughout the UK. The vaccines you may require will depend on your travel destination, how long you will be staying, what you will be doing there and your general health.

To secure your 60-minute appointment with one of our Travel Specialist Nurses, please book below.

£19

Please Note – This price is deducted from your final cost.

Cholera is an acute, diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the toxigenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 or O139. An estimated 2.9 million cases and 95,000 deaths occur each year around the world. The infection is often mild or without symptoms but can be severe.

£56

 per dose

Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver caused by a virus that’s spread through blood and body fluids. It often does not cause any obvious symptoms in adults, and typically passes in a few months without treatment. But in children, it often persists for years and may eventually cause serious liver damage. Hepatitis B is less common in the UK than other parts of the world, but certain groups are at an increased risk.

£19.50

 per dose

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection spread through inhaling tiny droplets from the coughs or sneezes of an infected person. It mainly affects the lungs, but it can affect any part of the body, including the tummy (abdomen), glands, bones, and nervous system. TB is a potentially serious condition, but it can be cured if it’s treated with the right antibiotics.

Yellow fever is a very rare cause of illness in U.K. travellers. Illness ranges from a fever with aches and pains to severe liver disease with bleeding and yellowing skin (jaundice). Yellow fever infection is diagnosed based on laboratory testing, a person’s symptoms, and travel history.

(COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Most people infected with the virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment. However, some will become seriously ill and require medical attention. Older people and those with underlying medical conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, or cancer are more likely to develop serious illness. Anyone can get sick with COVID-19 and become seriously ill or die at any age.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral brain infection that’s spread through mosquito bites. It’s most common in rural areas in southeast Asia, the Pacific islands, and the Far East, but is very rare in travellers. The virus is found in pigs and birds and is passed to mosquitoes when they bite infected animals. It cannot be spread from person to person. There’s currently no cure for Japanese encephalitis. Treatment involves supporting the functions of the body as it tries to fight off the infection. The person usually needs to be admitted to hospital so they can be given fluids, oxygen, and medication to treat any symptoms.

£95

 per dose

Rabies is a rare but very serious infection of the brain and nerves. It’s usually caught from the bite or scratch of an infected animal, most often a dog. Rabies is found throughout the world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. It’s not found in the UK, except in a small number of wild bats. Rabies is almost always fatal once symptoms appear, but treatment before this is very effective.

£65

 per dose

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection that can spread throughout the body, affecting many organs. Without prompt treatment, it can cause serious complications and can be fatal. It’s caused by a bacterium called Salmonella typhi, which is related to the bacteria that cause salmonella food poisoning.

£32

Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by a virus that’s spread in the faeces of an infected person. It’s uncommon in the UK, but certain groups are at increased risk. This includes travellers to parts of the world with poor levels of sanitation, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs.

£55

Meningitis is an infection of the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord (meninges). It can affect anyone, but is most common in babies, young children, teenagers, and young adults. Meningitis can be very serious if not treated quickly. It can cause life-threatening blood poisoning (septicaemia) and result in permanent damage to the brain or nerves.

£50

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a human viral infectious disease involving the central nervous system and occurring in many parts of Europe and Asia. The virus is transmitted by the bite of infected ticks, found in woodland habitats. TBE is most often manifested as a two-phased illness.

Poliomyelitis, commonly shortened to polio, is an infectious disease caused by the poliovirus. In about 0.5 percent of cases, it moves from the gut to affect the central nervous system, and there is muscle weakness resulting in a flaccid paralysis. This can occur over a few hours to a few days.

£32

Prior to receiving any treatment you will complete a full travel risk assessment with our Travel Vaccine Specialist Nurse. The Nurse will gather all the required information from yourself and then advise on the recommended vaccines for your travel destination along with travel safety advice to enable you to avoid health and safety risks whilst you are away.

You will be provided with proof of vaccinations/medications to be presented at your destination of travel.

Cómo funciona

Paso 1

Book your Travel Advice and Vaccine Appointment online.

Paso 2

Attend your appointment with our Travel Vaccine Specialist Nurse.

Paso 3

Complete your travel risk assessment.

Paso 4

Receive the desired treatment and additional products ready for your trip!

Ubicaciones

Ubicaciones

Liverpool City Centre

57 Rodney Street Liverpool L1 9AT

(Available to book Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays)

Wirral

Skinplicity 9 Church Rd Bebington CH63 7PG

(Available to book on Wednesday to Friday)

Liverpool City Centre

57 Rodney Street Liverpool L1 9AT

(Available to book Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays)

Bank

32 Cornhill, Cornhill London EC3V 3SG

(Available to book Monday to Friday)

Manchester (Stretford)

Unit 3, Empress Business Centre Chester Rd M16 9EA

(Available to book Mondays and Thursdays)

Frequently Asked Questions

Scroll down to find what your are looking for.

Travel, Vaccines & Medications

It depends on where you are going and what you will be doing. We will complete a full and comprehensive travel risk assessment to establish the vaccines and medications you need for your trip.

You should be up to date on routine vaccines, such as measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), tetanus, flu and COVID19, Depending on where you’re going and what activities you plan, other vaccines may be recommended.

Routine Vaccines are those that are recommended for everyone in the United Kingdom based on their age, health condition, or other risk factors. You may think of these as the childhood vaccines you got before starting school, but some are routinely recommended for adults, like the yearly flu vaccine or every 10 years which is the tetanus booster for adults.

required vaccine is one that travellers must have in order to enter a country, based on that country’s regulations. Yellow fever, meningococcal, and polio vaccines may be required by certain countries.

Recommended vaccines are those that we recommend travellers get to protect their health, even if they aren't required for entry by the government of the country you are visiting. They protect travellers from illnesses that are usually travel-related. For example, a typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid, a serious disease spread by contaminated food and water. The vaccines recommended for a traveller depend on several things, including age, health, and itinerary.

How long travel vaccines last depends on the vaccine. If you're travelling outside the United Kingdom, you should see a health care provider who is familiar with travel medicine at least 2 months before your trip as some vaccines require several doses over a period of weeks to be fully effective. The travel Immunisation specialist can give you advice about any vaccines and vaccine boosters based on where you are going and your previous vaccinations. Be sure to bring your vaccine records to your appointment!

When packing for trips abroad, don’t forget there may be special considerations for bringing your prescriptions and other medicines with you. Some medicines that are commonly prescribed or available over the counter in the United Kingdom can be illegal in other countries. Check with the embassy or consulate in the country you will be visiting to make sure your medicines are permitted in that country.

See your GP at least a month before you go to get any needed or extra medications, and pack medications in your hand luggage in case your luggage is lost.

We recommend you come and see us, even if you’ve left it as late as a day before you travel. We can still vaccinate you and we’ll also provide important health advice as well as Malaria Tablets if you need them.

Vaccination Effects & Concerns

Yes – vaccination is extremely important to protect yourself and your loved one from potentially serious illness. Medical care in other parts of the world is not always readily available or consistent with what is available in the United Kingdom, making prevention of illness that much more important.

You can still be advised on what vaccinations are recommended for your destination and travel specific vaccines can be given. You can likely obtain your vaccine record from your GP.

In principle, this shouldn’t be a problem: alcohol and vaccinations generally tolerate each other well. However, any complaints and side effects that may occur after vaccination may be magnified by alcohol.

If you are healthy, you will generally not experience any discomfort or side effects from the vaccinations. However, some people react more strongly to vaccinations than others. You may experience:

  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • A slight temperature
  • Painful sensation in the arm

No, contraceptives and vaccination go together without any problems.

In general, this is no problem at all. You may experience a sore arm or slight dizziness after a vaccination, but during sports or at work you will hardly experience any discomfort from your vaccination.

Yellow Fever, Malaria & Other Queries

Some countries require you to provide proof that you have been vaccinated against yellow fever by presenting an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP) when entering or when leaving a country. However, there are other popular travel destinations where the threat of infection with yellow fever virus is very real, andthere is no requirement for you to be vaccinated to enter the country.

If you only get the yellow fever vaccine before going to countries that require it, you could be putting your health at risk. Since yellow fever disease can be serious or even fatal, it is recommended that individuals be vaccinated when travelling to any areas where there is a risk of acquiring infection with yellow fever virus.

Yellow fever vaccine is only available at a yellow fever vaccine clinic, so call ahead (well in advance of travel) and book your appointment.

Even if you get the yellow fever vaccine, you can still get other diseases from mosquito bites, like malaria, dengue, and Zika. The best ways to prevent mosquito-borne diseases are to use insect repellent while outdoors, wear long pants and long sleeves, and choose accommodations with air conditioning or mosquito nets. For travel to areas where malaria is a risk, taking medicine that can prevent malaria may also be advised.

For most people, it takes up to 10 days after the vaccine is given to be protected against the yellow fever virus. If your destination requires yellow fever vaccine, the proof of vaccination does not become valid until 10 days after the vaccine is given

Some people should not get the yellow fever vaccine: infants younger than 6 months, or people with a history of a bad reaction to the vaccine should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If you have a thymus disorder associated with abnormal immune cell function (such as a thymoma or myasthenia gravis) you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If cancer, or the drugs or radiation used to treat cancer, has weakened your immune system, you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If you received an organ transplant and take medicines to prevent rejection of that transplant, you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. Other conditions and medicines can also affect your immune system and could be a reason not to receive yellow fever vaccine. Check with your doctor to find out more.

If you are older than 60 years old, pregnant, or breastfeeding, talk to your doctor before getting a yellow fever vaccine. There are potential risks to your health from the vaccine. If you are infected with HIV, talk to your doctor; you may still be able to get yellow fever vaccine, depending on your CD4 cell count and immune function. Infants 6–8 months old can receive yellow fever vaccine, although it is less risky to postpone travel to areas with yellow fever until the baby is 9 months of age or older. After the age of 9 months, the health risks from the vaccine are considerably lower.

Check the GOV.UK website for the most up-to-date information before you make international travel plans.

Zika frequently causes only mild symptoms, and people with Zika might not go to the doctor. If they go to a doctor, the doctor might not test for Zika or report cases to the government. A lack of reported cases does not mean a lack of risk.

It is recommended pregnant women and couples trying to become pregnant within the next 3 months first talk to their healthcare providers and carefully consider the risks and possible consequences of Zika infection before traveling to areas that report past or current spread of Zika but no current outbreak. Pregnant women: avoid mosquito bites and sexual exposure during travel. If partner travels, avoid sex or use condoms for remainder of pregnancy. Women planning to conceive may wish to delay pregnancy.

It is recommended that pregnant women not travel to areas where a Zika outbreak is occurring

The need to take malaria pills depends on the destination and the duration of your stay. This will be discussed during your visit to our Travel Clinic.

Malaria tablets can also be prescribed for children. To ensure that the correct dosage is prescribed, our travel nurse will weigh your child during the consultation.

This depends on the tablets and it will be discussed with you during your consultation. Moreover, instructions are given on the prescription and these will be printed on the label when you receive the tablets from the pharmacy. When planning an appointment, bear in mind that you’ll need to start taking some courses of malaria tablets up to three weeks before departure.

Which countries require yellow fever vaccine for travel?
Some countries require you to provide proof that you have been vaccinated against yellow fever by presenting an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP) when entering or when leaving a country. However, there are other popular travel destinations where the threat of infection with yellow fever virus is very real, andthere is no requirement for you to be vaccinated to enter the country.

If you only get the yellow fever vaccine before going to countries that require it, you could be putting your health at risk. Since yellow fever disease can be serious or even fatal, it is recommended that individuals be vaccinated when travelling to any areas where there is a risk of acquiring infection with yellow fever virus.

Yellow fever vaccine is only available at a yellow fever vaccine clinic, so call ahead (well in advance of travel) and book your appointment.

Even if you get the yellow fever vaccine, you can still get other diseases from mosquito bites, like malaria, dengue, and Zika. The best ways to prevent mosquito-borne diseases are to use insect repellent while outdoors, wear long pants and long sleeves, and choose accommodations with air conditioning or mosquito nets. For travel to areas where malaria is a risk, taking medicine that can prevent malaria may also be advised.
How far in advance of my trip do I need to get the yellow fever vaccine?
For most people, it takes up to 10 days after the vaccine is given to be protected against the yellow fever virus. If your destination requires yellow fever vaccine, the proof of vaccination does not become valid until 10 days after the vaccine is given.
Who should not get the yellow fever vaccine?
Some people should not get the yellow fever vaccine: infants younger than 6 months, or people with a history of a bad reaction to the vaccine should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If you have a thymus disorder associated with abnormal immune cell function (such as a thymoma or myasthenia gravis) you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If cancer, or the drugs or radiation used to treat cancer, has weakened your immune system, you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. If you received an organ transplant and take medicines to prevent rejection of that transplant, you should not receive yellow fever vaccine. Other conditions and medicines can also affect your immune system and could be a reason not to receive yellow fever vaccine. Check with your doctor to find out more.

If you are older than 60 years old, pregnant, or breastfeeding, talk to your doctor before getting a yellow fever vaccine. There are potential risks to your health from the vaccine. If you are infected with HIV, talk to your doctor; you may still be able to get yellow fever vaccine, depending on your CD4 cell count and immune function. Infants 6–8 months old can receive yellow fever vaccine, although it is less risky to postpone travel to areas with yellow fever until the baby is 9 months of age or older. After the age of 9 months, the health risks from the vaccine are considerably lower.
Is Zika a risk in my destination?
Check the GOV.UK website for the most up-to-date information before you make international travel plans.

Zika frequently causes only mild symptoms, and people with Zika might not go to the doctor. If they go to a doctor, the doctor might not test for Zika or report cases to the government. A lack of reported cases does not mean a lack of risk.

It is recommended pregnant women and couples trying to become pregnant within the next 3 months first talk to their healthcare providers and carefully consider the risks and possible consequences of Zika infection before traveling to areas that report past or current spread of Zika but no current outbreak. Pregnant women: avoid mosquito bites and sexual exposure during travel. If partner travels, avoid sex or use condoms for remainder of pregnancy. Women planning to conceive may wish to delay pregnancy.

It is recommended that pregnant women not travel to areas where a Zika outbreak is occurring
I know other travellers who did not receive any vaccinations and did not get sick. Are vaccinations really necessary?
Yes – vaccination is extremely important to protect yourself and your loved one from potentially serious illness. Medical care in other parts of the world is not always readily available or consistent with what is available in the United Kingdom, making prevention of illness that much more important.
What if I do not know my vaccination history?
You can still be advised on what vaccinations are recommended for your destination and travel specific vaccines can be given. You can likely obtain your vaccine record from your GP.
Can I drink alcohol after vaccines?
In principle, this shouldn’t be a problem: alcohol and vaccinations generally tolerate each other well. However, any complaints and side effects that may occur after vaccination may be magnified by alcohol.
Can I get ill after a vaccine?
If you are healthy, you will generally not experience any discomfort or side effects from the vaccinations. However, some people react more strongly to vaccinations than others. You may experience:
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • A slight temperature
  • Painful sensation in the arm
Do travel vaccines influence the effect of the contraceptive pill?
No, contraceptives and vaccination go together without any problems.
Can I work or play sports after a vaccination?
In general, this is no problem at all. You may experience a sore arm or slight dizziness after a vaccination, but during sports or at work you will hardly experience any discomfort from your vaccination.
Is it necessary to take Malaria tablets?
The need to take malaria pills depends on the destination and the duration of your stay. This will be discussed during your visit to our Travel Clinic.
Can Children take Malaria tablets?
Malaria tablets can also be prescribed for children. To ensure that the correct dosage is prescribed, our travel nurse will weigh your child during the consultation.
How long before my journey should I start taking Malaria tablets?
This depends on the tablets and it will be discussed with you during your consultation. Moreover, instructions are given on the prescription and these will be printed on the label when you receive the tablets from the pharmacy. When planning an appointment, bear in mind that you’ll need to start taking some courses of malaria tablets up to three weeks before departure.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Please understand that appointment times are limited and in high demand. When you book your appointment with us, you are holding a space on our calendar that is no longer available to our other customers. However, if you must cancel your appointment, we respectfully request at least 48 hours’ notice in order to allow another customer access to that appointment time. 

The “ON HOLD” option for appointments allows customers to place their appointments on hold up to 12 months free of charge. However, the original appointment date is still subject to the cancellation policy if then requested to be cancelled. 

Cancelling a Travel Advice and Vaccine appointment 48 hours or more in advance entitles you to a 100% refund.

Cancelling a Travel Advice and Vaccine appointment between 48 and 24 hours before entitles you to a 50% refund.

Cancellations made within 24 hours will not receive a refund.